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February 3, 2020
Leslie Rosenberg, physics professor, weighs in on new dark matter experiments. Featured on Smithsonian 
AxionLog
January 23, 2020
Axions are one of the leading dark matter candidates and of great interest to the theoretical and experimental communities. This workshop aims to explore the current state of the axion field, including reviewing recent theoretical developments, astrophysical observations, laboratory-based experiments and novel ideas which could lead to the discovery of the QCD dark-matter axion. The workshop will report on the current state of the field and the direction of this research going forwards... Read more
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January 13, 2020
Associate professor of physics, Gray Rybka, discusses how new technology that creates "atom waves" could impact the field of physics. Featured on Scientific American 
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January 1, 2020
Gerald Miller, physics professor, discusses the history of how what we know about the atom was discovered. Featured on Live Science 
Neutrino Mass
December 5, 2019
Read more of an article from the American Physical Society that overviews the neutrino mass programs. It references work in which the UW was/is a major player; SNO Project (Nobel prize 2015), the KATRIN project (current mass limits - see PRL) and Project 8 (the next generation neutrino mass experiment, currently residing in Physics-Astronomy Building basement).
Individual nanodisks and nanorods of the golden ‘lollipops'
November 8, 2019
Electrons in atoms are pretty talented. They can form chemical bonds, get kicked out of the atom and even “jump” to different locations based on their energetic states. In 1961, atomic physicist Ugo Fano theorized that electrons harbor another and unexpected talent: They can interfere with themselves as they simultaneously take two different quantum-mechanical paths. On one path, they jump within the atom between discrete energy states. On the other path, they jump off the atom into the... Read more
UW Satellite Lab
October 31, 2019
A satellite smaller than a loaf of bread will, if all goes well, launch this weekend on its way to low-Earth orbit. It will be the first student-built satellite from Washington state to go into space. Featured on UW News 
optical-element-surface
October 7, 2019
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in the journal Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. The team’s design principles and experimental findings... Read more
02_katrin
September 23, 2019
At the 2019 Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics conference in Toyama, Japan, leaders from the KATRIN experiment reported on Friday that the estimated range for the rest mass of the neutrino is no larger than 1 electron volt, or eV. These inaugural results obtained earlier this year by the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment — or KATRIN — cut the mass range for the neutrino by more than half by lowering the upper limit of the neutrino’s mass from 2 eV to 1 eV. The University of... Read more

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